Events and Meetings

There are no events or meetings at this time.

News

Epolene Polymers for the Rubber Industry

In 2006, Westlake Chemical Corporation purchased the Epolene® low molecular weight polyethylene and polypropylene wax business from Eastman Chemical, introducing them into the rubber industry. Westlake has been known more prominently in the plastics business as the largest producer of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) in North America.

Epolene Polymers for the Rubber Industry Details

 Epolene Polymers for the Rubber Industry

 

In 2006, Westlake Chemical Corporation purchased the Epolene® low molecular weight polyethylene and polypropylene wax business from Eastman Chemical, introducing them into the rubber industry. Westlake has been known more prominently in the plastics business as the largest producer of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) in North America.  In 2009, the Epolene line celebrated 50 years of formulation success in many diverse applications and markets. Harwick Standard has promoted the Epolene line of low molecular weight polyethylene and polypropylene waxes since 1967. These time-tested products are based on a proprietary high-pressure, free radical technology that directly creates low molecular weight polyethylene products that perform as internal-lubricant/process aids and external mold release agents in various polymeric (elastomeric) systems.  These non-polar grades are soft with high penetration hardness values and low melt points that allow flow out, coating, and lubrication of the polymer chains.  Epolenes are typically used in non-polar elastomers such as EPDM, synthetic Polyisoprene, Natural Rubber, Polybutadiene Rubber, NBR, SBR and Block Copolymers as well as in hot melt adhesives.

 

The Epolene product line is divided into 3 major classes of low molecular weight polymers: N types - Normal (non-emulsifiable), C types – Coating, and E types - Emulsifiable. The rubber industry tends to utilize the N types and C types. The flagship N-type product is Epolene N-34P (powder) which as a low-density product with a relatively low melt point (103°C) is utilized in EPDM compounds and block copolymers as well as Natural Rubber.  Epolene N-11P and N-14P have demonstrated the ease with which they bloom to rubber surfaces to aid in mold release and help processing.  Both Epolene N-11P and N-14P are very low molecular weight polymers with average molecular weight values of 2000 and 1700 g/mol respectively. Additionally, these grades also have found use in NBR, SBR, and Butyl rubbers.

 

The C type products have proven to be very good process aids. Epolene C-10 has a higher molecular weight than Epolene N-34P. This higher molecular weight delivers a robustness to the final product and allows even higher mixing temperatures to be utilized. Epolene C-10 is used in EPDM as well as other non-polar and somewhat polar elastomers including NBR, SBR and Butyl rubbers. It is particularly effective in temperature sensitive peroxide cure formulations. Typical loading levels of N and C type products in elastomeric compounds are 1.5-5.0 parts per hundred and can be used at levels as high as 10.0 parts in very demanding applications.

 

In addition to lubrication, many of the Epolene products when used in elastomeric systems allow for:

 

            - ease of dispersion of fillers                 - improved flow properties

- reduced shrinkage                               - reduced tackiness during processing  

- surface gloss                                      - improved dispersion of peroxide cure systems

 

These products also find use in several different classes of thermoplastics including vinyls and olefins. Epolene E types, including E-14P, an oxidized low molecular weight polyethylene, and Epolene E-20, are used as internal lubricants.  Furthermore, the E types typically are more compatible with PVC and aid internally as process aids.  The N types, such as Epolene N-11 are less compatible and tend to aid externally as lubricants.  In olefins, Epolene N-14 works very well as a mold release agent particularly for HDPE.  Epolene E-43 is a chemically treated propylene based product.  It performs favorably as a coupling agent for fillers in polypropylene. In addition, Epolene C-26 has been shown to help couple natural fibers in LDPE, HDPE and LLDPE.

           

We can provide a variety of process aids for your polymer systems, whether it is for elastomers or thermoplastics.  Harwick Standard and Westlake Polymers stand ready to tackle your processing issues with solutions from the Epolene® line of products. 

www.harwick.com

Harwick PVC Processing Solutions

Visit from Akron Mayor

Visit from Akron Mayor, Dan Horrigan, and Deputy Mayor for Economic Development, Sam DeShazior.

Visit from Akron Mayor Details

March 7, 2017: Ernie Pouttu, Harwick Standard President & CEO, along with the employees, welcome a visit from Akron Mayor, Dan Horrigan, and Deputy Mayor for Economic Development, Sam DeShazior.

Harwick Standard proudly offers Daikin FKM Elastomer Line

Harwick Standard has partnered with Daikin-America to market the complete line of DAI-EL™ fluoroelastomers. This line includes general purpose and specialty grades of copolymers and terpolymers, peroxide curabale copolymers and terpolymers, base resistant fluoroelastomers and perfluoroelastomers (FFKMs).

Harwick Standard proudly offers Daikin FKM Elastomer Line Details

 Harwick Standard proudly offers Daikin’s FKM Elastomer Line                                

October 2016

 

Harwick Standard has partnered with Daikin-America to market the complete line of DAI-EL™ fluoroelastomers. This line includes general purpose and specialty grades of copolymers and terpolymers, peroxide curabale copolymers and terpolymers, base resistant fluoroelastomers and perfluoroelastomers (FFKMs).

 

The DAI-EL product line includes a wide range of Mooney viscosities and cure rates for excellent processability and productivity in a wide array of processes including compression molding, injection and transfer molding, extrusion and calendering.   Daikin is continually working on new and improved fluoroelastomer technologies to exceed the current and future needs of the automotive, aerospace, medical, semiconductor processing, energy and consumer markets.  The DAI-EL portfolio offers a full range of physical properties, heat and chemical resistance, and low temperature flexibility to provide superior performance in any environment.

 

Daikin’s fully equipped U.S. laboratories and knowledgeable technical staff provide the most responsive technical service and application development available today.  They are supported by a state of the art research and development center in Japan where new DAI-EL fluoroelastomers are developed in lab scale polymerization reactors. 

 

Recent developments from Daikin include a new generation of fluorinated terpolymers with excellent mold flow and lower compression set for improved sealing ability.  Daikin also offers a new GBR series of base-resistant elastomers and a new line of perfluoroelastomers.  The GBR products provide the best overall balance of base resistance, low temperature flexibility, fuel resistance and sealing ability available today, while the new line of perfluoroelastomers offers the ultimate in sealing performance.

 

To learn more about the Daikin DAI-EL product line, contact your Harwick Standard sales representative, or our Technical Director, David Schultz, to discuss your next fluorinated elastomer project.

 

www.harwick.com

Synergistic Additives for Flame Retardant Elastomer Systems

It is very common today to rely on a number of ingredients that are added together in an elastomeric compound to create a flame retardant product. These classical ingredients typically can be of one or two different classes of chemicals, either halogen containing or halogen-free. They can react chemically or physically to create these types of final products that are used to meet fire requirements in our industries. The halogens today, along with other chemistries, are under a great amount of scrutiny as we strive to develop more health, safety and environmental solutions to flame retardant requirements.

Synergistic Additives for Flame Retardant Elastomer Systems Details

It is very common today to rely on a number of ingredients that are added together in an elastomeric compound to create a flame retardant product. These classical ingredients typically can be of one or two different classes of chemicals, either halogen containing or halogen-free. They can react chemically or physically to create these types of final products that are used to meet fire requirements in our industries.

The halogens today, along with other chemistries, are under a great amount of scrutiny as we strive to develop more health, safety and environmental solutions to flame retardant requirements.

When carrying out the addition of ingredients to create flame retardant compounds, one must first consider the advantages (synergism) that can take place. It is also very important to determine which ingredients may offset one another. Typically, various chemistries are combined in an effort to create a flame retardant system. During the development stage, one must consider both the advantages and disadvantages that can come about. However, the halogen containing systems are in lower favor today, as halogen-free based systems now take center stage.

The classical synergism on the chemical side is the age-old antimony oxide that must be paired with a halogen donor at a 1:3 ratio as the antimony trihalide (chlorine or bromine) is the key active ingredient. This active ingredient acts by inhibiting chain branching free radical reactions in the gas phase of the fire. It is not uncommon to rely as well on zinc borate (Firebrake ZB) which can synergistically react with antimony oxide (by partial replacement) as well with halogens. The zinc borate alternately reduces the amount of smoke generated by increasing char and giving off water of hydration to quench the flame. Rio Tinto, our supplier, confirms after recent research that zinc borate is a unique multifunctional fire retardant synergist that enhances effectiveness of existing fire retardant systems significantly by reducing fumes and smoke as well as suppressing afterglow. This is in conjunction with, and without, antimony oxide and is due to its capability to act synergistically on a multitude of fronts.

In addition, it is known that aliphatic chlorinated paraffins, (Dover’s Paroil & Harwick Standard’s CPW-100), when added to a system can act to replace at least a portion of the process oil that might be present, thereby aiding in reduction of the ignition of organic compounding ingredients.

We also need to consider the ingredients that are added at fairly high levels in halogen-free systems as they are quite efficient in the physical sense as flame retardant additives. First, phosphorus containing products play a large role in flame retarding elastomeric systems. It is very common to utilize organophosphorus compounds to replace a portion of the plasticizer content, namely phthalates, paraffinic or naphthenic process oils. They work in the gas as well as the condensed phase of a fire scenario. It has recently been determined that the newer alkyl diphenyl type phosphates, such as ICL’s Phosflex 375, is best to replace the standard isopropylated diphenyl types, Phosflex 41L, due to recently determined HS& E issues.

In addition, hydrates and hydroxides, namely Polyfil ATH from Custom Grinders, is commonly used in elastomers to quench the flame by giving its water of hydration. For higher processing temperature applications, magnesium hydroxide functions as a flame retardant and a smoke suppressant when used at high levels in some elastomer and plastic compounds. They can be used alone or with zinc borate, and have been shown to have synergistic effects.

During compound development, on one front, it is not uncommon to utilize a combination of chemical and physical reactions and the synergistic relationships to create compounds. In applications such as highly loaded EPDM roofing where one could utilize antimony oxide, chlorinated paraffins, zinc borate and fillers to aid in developing a compound that passes stringent flame retardant requirements.

Today, however, it might be more common and suggested to take advantage only of the physical interactions and create a similar flame retardant compound utilizing phosphate esters, ATH, zinc borate and fillers to create a similarly flame retardant product to be used in a myriad of industrial applications.

It is therefore, most important to consider your options and customer requirements as one should also remember synergistic effects and HS&E ramifications as you develop the flame retardant compounds for the future industrial applications.

If you would like further information or product samples, please contact your local Harwick Standard Sales Representative, or our Technical Director, David Schultz.

www.harwick.com

Harwick Standard adds Sundow CPE to Supplier Portfolio

We are pleased to announce the addition of our latest supplier and line of products that will be offered by Harwick Standard Distribution Corporation.

Harwick Standard adds Sundow CPE to Supplier Portfolio Details

Akron, OH (January 20, 2016) - Harwick Standard Distribution Corporation, headquartered in Akron, OH, is pleased to announce they will represent Sundow Polymers Co Ltd, China with their extensive line of Chlorinated Polyethylene (CPE) products under their Wellpren™ trade name.  

Sundow Polymers Co. Ltd is a high-tech chemical company that is focused on R&D, manufacturing and marketing of chlorinated polymers. They are one of the industrial pioneers and leaders of Chlorinated Polyethylene (CPE) and Chlorinated Polyvinyl Chloride (CPVC) in China. They have been in the R&D chlorinated polymers business for over 13 years. Sundow Polymers is located in the Yellow River delta development zone in the Shangdong Province.


About Harwick Standard Distribution

In 2012, Harwick celebrated 80 years of service to the rubber, thermoplastics and other polymer-related industries. Harwick Standard is a management-owned and operated sales and marketing organization headquartered in Akron, Ohio. The ISO 9001 registered company operates a nationwide distribution network supplying products from more than 30 blue chip manufacturers. Harwick Standard is a proud member of the National Association of Chemical Distributors (NACD) and practices the NACD's Responsible Distribution ProcessSM. Information on the Company’s products and services can be found on their website at www.harwickstandard.com.


Media Contact
Mr. Dan Davis
Harwick Standard Distribution Corporation
(330) 798-9300
ddavis@harwick.com

History of PVC In Akron

The Akron Section of the Society of Plastics Engineers, along with the Vinyl Plastics Division of the SPE, hosted a conference this past fall that highlighted a most ubiquitous polymeric material. The subject of this conference was Vinyl, more commonly known as PVC. This material was front and center in Akron, Ohio in 1926 with the advent of Plasticized or Flexible PVC by B.F. Goodrich’s, Dr. Waldo Semon, who at that time was in the process of pioneering an industry. We are excited to provide a short history of how this great industry has morphed over the last many years, and how pivotal Akron was during this development with the aid of Dr. Waldo Semon, and the B.F Goodrich Company.

History of PVC In Akron Details

The Akron Section of the Society of Plastics Engineers, along with the Vinyl Plastics Division of the SPE, hosted a conference this past fall that highlighted a most ubiquitous polymeric material. The subject of this conference was Vinyl, more commonly known as PVC. This material was front and center in Akron, Ohio in 1926 with the advent of Plasticized or Flexible PVC by B.F. Goodrich’s, Dr. Waldo Semon, who at that time was in the process of pioneering an industry.

We are excited to provide a short history of how this great industry has morphed over the last many years, and how pivotal Akron was during this development with the aid of Dr. Waldo Semon, and the B.F Goodrich Company.

It all started in 1870, on the soil here in Akron, Ohio when Dr. Benjamin Franklin Goodrich founded the B.F. Goodrich Company. Shortly thereafter, an engineer from the Northwest Territory, Dr. Waldo Semon, was highly instrumental in jump-starting the vinyl industry. Dr. Waldo Semon, known as “A Man of Ideas” is credited as the inventor of Plasticized Polyvinyl Chloride, even though PVC had been discovered in Europe at a much earlier date. Dr. Semon was able to bring a practical nature to the use of PVC and developed the cotton covered fire hose, and later, around 1926, the waterproof rain coat and PVC coated umbrella. Dr. Semon informed that even though scientists had been studying vinyl polymers for more than 50 years, no commercial use had ever been developed for these compounds, because process and handling was of the utmost importance. He informed in a historical facts book that “he was much happier when he could see practical results of his labor”. Innovation, according to Waldo Semon, “is not just one thing from one person. It is not just research. It is not just development. It is not just marketability. It is a combination of all these things and it’s a dedicated group of people all contributing to an idea.”

During 1930-1970’s, the B.F. Goodrich Company continued on with a reduced interest in PVC. They instead focused on their tire expertise during the big war periods (WWI & WWII), which Dr. Semon also played a large role in. It was not until the late 60’s and early 70’s that the focus again shifted to vinyl. The early markets found vinyl being used in electrical insulation, flooring tiles, garden hose, draperies and luggage. At that time,all other tire companies located in Akron had limited involvement in the PVC market. This included Goodyear, which in 1968 promoted the “instant do it yourself floor” and Neothane roofing, that supplemented their flooring business. In addition, Goodyear had a full line of household products including vinyl garden hoses, shower curtains, garment bags and rain coats made of Pliofilm. They also promoted their Pliotuf line of nitrile PVC products, all supplied from vinyl from their Niagara Falls, NY plant. In the 1970’s and 1980’s, General Tire jumped in with both feet and augmented their tire business as GenCorp and developed their business dealing in flooring and wall covering, which was all supported from their own vinyl plant in Niagara Falls, NY. Firestone also promoted their own offerings in the 1990’s, with their Building Products Company, that marketed PVC roofing membrane and vinyl monofilament.

It is easy to understand that all the tire factions jumped on the band wagon in those early days and found their own niche market so they too could be listed as experts in this new polymer. It is surprising to note that for the most part, B. F. Goodrich, who started this fray, ended up being the company with the most longevity in the PVC business.

In the late 1980’s, B.F Goodrich went into a joint venture with Uniroyal Tire that would leave PVC, specialty chemicals, and aerospace to expand their own horizons. Once again, B.F.Goodrich continued further development of compounds and processes and jumped into action during the late 80’s and developed improved PVC compounds for the pipe, siding, and floor covering markets.

In 1993, after a wild run at these booming markets, Geon spun off from B.F. Goodrich and became the 3rd largest PVC resin supplier in North America. Today, Geon Performance Materials is owned and operated by PolyOne, after a merger between Geon and M.A Hanna in 2000. They are headquartered in Avon Lake, Ohio. Shortly after PolyOne purchased Geon, the resin-producing portion of their business was spun off.

The PVC industry owes a great debt of gratitude to the man, Dr. Waldo Semon, who filed for US PVC Patent #1,929,453, and who stated he, ”at his heart - an engineer interested in science” was ultimately nicknamed the “man who wrapped the world in Vinyl”.


David R. Schultz, Technical Director
Harwick Standard Distribution Corporation
Co-Chair – Vinyltec 2015 – Akron, Ohio

Arlanxeo Joins Harwick Standard

Arlanxeo is expanding its distribution network with the addition of Harwick Standard Distribution Corporation for its High Performance Elastomers (HPE) products in the eastern United States.

Arlanxeo Joins Harwick Standard Details

Arlanxeo is expanding its distribution network with the addition of Harwick Standard Distribution Corporation for its High Performance Elastomers (HPE) products in the Continental United States.
The agreement includes the following Arlanxeo HPE products:

  • Baymod® NBR
  • Baypren® CR
  • Keltan® EPDM
  • Krynac® NBR
  • Levamelt® EVM
  • Levapren® EVM
  • Perbunan® NBR
  • Therban® HNBR

Arlanxeo is a leading specialty chemicals company with sales of EUR 8.0 billion in 2014 and about 16,600 employees in 29 countries. The company is currently represented at 52 production sites worldwide. The core business of Arlanxeo is the development, manufacturing and marketing of plastics, rubber, intermediates and specialty chemicals. Arlanxeo is a member of the leading sustainability indices Dow Jones Sustainability Index (DJSI World and DJSI Europe) and FTSE4Good.

Synthos S.A. joins Harwick

Synthos S.A., one of Europe’s leading Synthetic Rubber Manufacturers teams up with Akron-based Harwick Standard Distribution Corporation.

Synthos S.A. joins Harwick Details

Synthos S.A., one of Europe’s leading Synthetic Rubber Manufacturers teams up with Akron-based Harwick Standard Distribution Corporation

Synthos S.A., (www.synthosgroup.com) one of Europe’s largest manufacturers of synthetic rubber has announced a strategic sales alliance with Ohio based Harwick Standard Distribution Corporation to distribute Synthos styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and butadiene rubber (BR) products in the United States and Canada.

New Brochures for the industry.

New Product Brochures.

New Brochures for the industry. Details

 

Peroxides for Rubber Roll Industry - www.harwick.com/files/Peroxides_Rubber_Roll.pdf

Raw Materials for Rubber Roll Covers and Mill Mixing - www.harwick.com/files/Raw_Materials_for_Rubber_Roll_Covers_Mill_Mixing.pdf

Raw Materials for the Wire and Cable Industry - www.harwick.com/files/Wire_and_Cable_Market_Brochure.pdf

Raw Materials for the PVC Market - www.harwick.com/files/PVC_Market_Flexible_and_Rigid_Brochure.pdf

An Introduction to Flame Retardants - www.harwick.com/files/Flame_Retardant_Brochure.pdf